Venice, mapped.

Explore Venice differently.

Palaces of the Grand Canal in Venice – A Tagged Map

While riding the vaporetto water-bus along the Canal Grande, Venice’s Grand Canal, have you ever wondered what the names of those marvelous palaces are? Here is a  a map with the names of the palaces on the Grand Canal   in Bing Maps – select the satellite view and zoom in until you can see the front of the palaces (a feature Google Maps does not offer any longer – bummer). Names of people may be shown, they are the architects who designed the palace. Most Venetian palace names begin with the word Ca’ which simply means “house” or casa, in Italian, which is shortened into ca’  and followed by the name of the original owners of the homestead – e.g. Ca’ Marcello would be the ancestral dwelling of the Marcello family.

We also provide two new maps of the palaces of the Grand Canal in Bing maps. The two maps show the West bank and the East bank of the Grand Canal, respectively: Palaces of the Grand Canal 1 – West Bank    Palaces of the Grand Canal 2 – East Bank.

Google has recently changed the features of its Google Maps service – specifically, they removed the 45-degree satellite view, which  ruined the work done on the Google Maps  tagged map  of the Grand Canal palaces we created previously. The map is still available, as we are still adding info to it, while planning for the definitive transfer of all the information to Bing. (Sorry, Google Maps, you let us down on this!).

Further reading

If you are interested in discovering curious stories  about the Grand Canal and its beautiful palaces, we recommend this book:

Alberto Toso Fei’s The Secrets of the Grand Canal

which provides little-known, interesting stories and legends on many of the most remarkable palaces and places along Venice’s Grand Canal, on the people who built them and called them home. Concise but well-documented. Also provides a map of the Grand Canal with reference.

 

If you are interested in curious itineraries and good eat-outs to explore when in Venice, we highly recommend

The secret Venice of Corto Maltese by Lele Vianello and Guido Fuga:

Following the imaginary footsteps of the world-renown comics character Corto Maltese, and the real likes and promenades of his creator, Hugo Pratt, this book suggests seven itineraries, seven doors  that provide access to some of the most intimate places, venues, and eateries in Venice.  The itineraries are pivoted on good places where you can eat true Venetian food and the text is interspersed with historical and literary information, providing anecdotes about curious artifacts, ancient relics from Venice distant past that have survived to this day and have an interesting story to tell, and which you would never imagine existed unless you are a local.

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