Venice, mapped.

Explore Venice differently.

Archive for the category “Venice visit”

To the Lido by bike

Venice’s Lido (i.e. beach) is one of the most interesting locations around the lagoon. The place sits is on its own island and can be easily reached by vaporetto boat from Venice and from the mainland (boat from Punta Sabbioni, near Jesolo-Cavallino). You can also reach it by car by taking the ferry in Fusina, near Mestre. A third option, along a much longer, tiresome route is also possible: boat from Chioggia to Pellestrina, and then bus, from Pellestrina to Lido (via the ferry boat connecting S. Maria del Mare with Alberoni). The Lido island hosts three small towns/villages: Lido, Malamocco, and Alberoni. The Lido is world-renown for its movie festival, glamorous beach-front hotels, and sunbathing seashore. Also notable, private homes built around 1900-1930 in the Italian declination of  the Art Nouveau style, namely Stile Liberty. The dwellings were commissioned by affluent families and industrialists to local architects. The homes are located in several streets, all around the Lido, so the best way to sightsee the location is to use a bicycle. You can get one from local bike rental places, or take your own. To get your bike aboard a vaporetto/boat, you must pay an additional, inexpensive ticket for the bike itself. Alternatively, if you have a folding bike (use suggested) you can just fold it, place it into a bike-carrying bag, and get on board with no additional ticket/fee. Again, if you manage to get around the Lido by riding a bike (which we strongly recommend), do not miss the ride along the beautiful stretch of road connecting Malamocco to Alberoni, shaded by large maritime pine trees. We have included a map showing the location of the main Stile Liberty houses you can see from your bike. Ride along!

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Venice Vaporetto Waterbus Stops & Lines – A Tagged Map – Completed!

We have completed the mapping of Venice’s vaporetto waterbus lines. The lines are split into three separate maps (due to Google Maps’ limitations – sorry!). Here they are:

VAPORETTO LINES 1 through 5.2 which covers the main vaporetto lines in Venice and beyond;

VAPORETTO LINES 6 through 11 which covers vaporetto lines linking Venice to other islands of the lagoon;

VAPORETTO LINES 12 through 22 which covers more “exotic” lines, connecting the mainland to Venice and other islands of Venice’s lagoon.

We plan to add maps for the other company providing waterbus services in Venice – Alilaguna – soon, as they are the only one providing a public waterbus service from/to the Venezia Marco Polo airport in Tessera (Venice’s airport).

– To cruise along the Grand Canal, you can choose between two lines: Line 1, which stops more frequently (longer travel time) or Line 2, which stops less frequently (shorter travel time).

– If your destination is Piazza San Marco, the closest stops are those that read like SAN MARCO or S. MARCO and those that read S. ZACCARIA DANIELI (SAN ZACCARIA DANIELI) or S. ZACCARIA JOLANDA (SAN ZACCARIA JOLANDA). If you look at the map, you’ll see that all the other SAN ZACCARIA stops are relatively close to Piazza San Marco.

– If you arrive by car and park at the Tronchetto, Line 2 is the fastest connection to Piazza San Marco that also provides a Grand Canal cruise.

– If you are going to visit any of the Biennale exhibitions, get off at the GIARDINI (BIENNALE) stop for the main exhibit area, and at the ARSENALE stop to visit the Corderie and Arsenale exhibit area.

– For on-request stops (e.g. CERTOSA), when on board, ask one of the crew members to stop there. If you are at one of the on-request stops, dial the free-of-charge number 800845065 and ask for the boat to stop.

There are vaporetto waterbuses also from the mainland to Venice. The three spots from which you can reach Venice by parking your car on the mainland are the Cavallino/Treporti/Punta Sabbioni waterbus stops, which are located north of Venice, the Chioggia waterbus stops – south of Venice, and the Fusina waterbus stop, east of Venice, near Mestre. Depending on the location, the travel time to reach Venice may exceed one hour though – so check the ACTV (the vaporetto company) timetables in advance of your travel.   Of course, you can also drive your car all the way to the Tronchetto car park and catch a vaporetto there.

Further reading

If you are interested in discovering curious stories  about the Grand Canal and its beautiful palaces, we recommend this book:

Alberto Toso Fei’s The Secrets of the Grand Canal

which provides little-known, interesting stories and legends on many of the most remarkable palaces and places along Venice’s Grand Canal, on the people who built them and called them home. Concise but well-documented. Also provides a map of the Grand Canal with reference.

If you are interested in curious itineraries and good eat-outs to explore when in Venice, we highly recommend

The secret Venice of Corto Maltese by Lele Vianello and Guido Fuga:

Following the imaginary footsteps of the world-renown comics character Corto Maltese, and the real likes and promenades of his creator, Hugo Pratt, this book suggests seven itineraries, seven doors  that provide access to some of the most intimate places, venues, and eateries in Venice.  The itineraries are pivoted on good places where you can eat true Venetian food and the text is interspersed with historical and literary information, providing anecdotes about curious artifacts, ancient relics from Venice distant past that have survived to this day and have an interesting story to tell, and which you would never imagine existed unless you are a local.

Venice Vaporetto/Waterbus Stops

We have completed the mapping of Venice’s vaporetto waterbus lines. The lines are split into three separate maps (due to Google Maps’ limitations – sorry!). Here they are:

VAPORETTO LINES 1 through 5.2 which covers the main vaporetto lines in Venice and beyond;

VAPORETTO LINES 6 through 11 which covers vaporetto lines linking Venice to other islands of the lagoon;

VAPORETTO LINES 12 through 22 which covers more “exotic” lines, connecting the mainland to Venice and other islands of Venice’s lagoon.

Palaces Of The Grand Canal – A Tagged Map – updates

We have added information on some buildings of the Grand Canal: Ca’ Giustinian Persico, Ca’ Marcello “dei leoni”, and Ca’ Corner della Ca’ Granda – see the two maps that show the West bank and the East bank of the Grand Canal, respectively: Palaces of the Grand Canal – East Bank and Palaces of the Grand Canal – West Bank. Click on ‘Visione Panoramica’, zoom in and use left/right arrows until you can see the front of the palaces (as seen from the waterfront).

Palaces Of The Grand Canal – A Tagged Map – updates

We have added information on some buildings of the Grand Canal’s West bank: Palazzo Querini DuboisCa’ Coccina Tiepolo Papadopoli / Palazzo Papadopoli, and Ca’ Bernardo – see the map Palaces of the Grand Canal – West Bank.

While riding the vaporetto water-bus along the Canal Grande, Venice’s Grand Canal, have you ever wondered what the names of those marvelous palaces are?

We provide two maps of the palaces of the Grand Canal in Bing maps. The two maps show the West bank and the East bank of the Grand Canal, respectively: Palaces of the Grand Canal – East Bank and Palaces of the Grand Canal – West Bank. Click on ‘Visione Panoramica’, zoom in and use left/right arrows until you can see the front of the palaces (as seen from the waterfront).

Palaces Of The Grand Canal – A Tagged Map – updates

We have added information on some buildings of the Grand Canal’s East bank: Ca’ Moro-Lin, PalazzinaG, and Palazzo Grassi Valmarana Palaces of the Grand Canal – East Bank.

While riding the vaporetto water-bus along the Canal Grande, Venice’s Grand Canal, have you ever wondered what the names of those marvelous palaces are?

We provide two maps of the palaces of the Grand Canal in Bing maps. The two maps show the West bank and the East bank of the Grand Canal, respectively: Palaces of the Grand Canal – East Bank and Palaces of the Grand Canal – West Bank. Click on ‘Visione Panoramica’, zoom in and use left/right arrows until you can see the front of the palaces (as seen from the waterfront).

Names of the Palaces of the Grand Canal in Venice. A Tagged Map. Updates

We have added information to the tags of Ca’ Giustinian [Biennale] and Palazzo Giustinian [near Ca’ Foscari].

While riding the vaporetto water-bus along the Canal Grande, Venice’s Grand Canal, have you ever wondered what the names of those marvelous palaces are?

We provide two maps of the palaces of the Grand Canal in Bing maps. The two maps show the West bank and the East bank of the Grand Canal, respectively: Palaces of the Grand Canal 1 – West Bank    Palaces of the Grand Canal 2 – East Bank. Zoom in until you can see the front of the palaces (from the waterfront).

Also, a map with the names of the palaces on the Grand Canal   in Bing Maps  for both banks

Most Venetian palace names begin with the word Ca’ which simply means “house” or casa, in Italian, which is shortened into ca’  and followed by the name of the original owners of the homestead – e.g. Ca’ Marcello would be the ancestral dwelling of the Marcello family.

Churches of Venice and Curiosities – Updated Map

We have added some items to our map with basic info on Venice churches and other places of interest, including some places on the Giudecca island.

Key to the placeholders: church with description (orange), church yet to be described (blue), curiosity (green), museum-place of interest (yellow).

colophon

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