Venice, mapped.

Explore Venice differently.

Archive for the tag “tour”

Venice Vaporetto/Waterbus Stops

We have completed the mapping of Venice’s vaporetto waterbus lines. The lines are split into three separate maps (due to Google Maps’ limitations – sorry!). Here they are:

VAPORETTO LINES 1 through 5.2 which covers the main vaporetto lines in Venice and beyond;

VAPORETTO LINES 6 through 11 which covers vaporetto lines linking Venice to other islands of the lagoon;

VAPORETTO LINES 12 through 22 which covers more “exotic” lines, connecting the mainland to Venice and other islands of Venice’s lagoon.

Palaces Of The Grand Canal – A Tagged Map – updates

We have added information on some buildings of the Grand Canal’s West bank: Palazzo Querini DuboisCa’ Coccina Tiepolo Papadopoli / Palazzo Papadopoli, and Ca’ Bernardo – see the map Palaces of the Grand Canal – West Bank.

While riding the vaporetto water-bus along the Canal Grande, Venice’s Grand Canal, have you ever wondered what the names of those marvelous palaces are?

We provide two maps of the palaces of the Grand Canal in Bing maps. The two maps show the West bank and the East bank of the Grand Canal, respectively: Palaces of the Grand Canal – East Bank and Palaces of the Grand Canal – West Bank. Click on ‘Visione Panoramica’, zoom in and use left/right arrows until you can see the front of the palaces (as seen from the waterfront).

Names of the Palaces of the Grand Canal in Venice. A Tagged Map. Updates

We have added information to the tags of Ca’ Giustinian [Biennale] and Palazzo Giustinian [near Ca’ Foscari].

While riding the vaporetto water-bus along the Canal Grande, Venice’s Grand Canal, have you ever wondered what the names of those marvelous palaces are?

We provide two maps of the palaces of the Grand Canal in Bing maps. The two maps show the West bank and the East bank of the Grand Canal, respectively: Palaces of the Grand Canal 1 – West Bank    Palaces of the Grand Canal 2 – East Bank. Zoom in until you can see the front of the palaces (from the waterfront).

Also, a map with the names of the palaces on the Grand Canal   in Bing Maps  for both banks

Most Venetian palace names begin with the word Ca’ which simply means “house” or casa, in Italian, which is shortened into ca’  and followed by the name of the original owners of the homestead – e.g. Ca’ Marcello would be the ancestral dwelling of the Marcello family.

Churches of Venice – A Tagged Map

We are building a tagged map showing the location of (almost) all the churches in Venice, with some basic information on what to see and how-when it is possible to access them.

While doing some research on the subject, we have stumbled onto this great web site, The Churches of Venice that provides concise but interesting information on the churches.

Enjoy!

Venice Palaces of the Grand Canal – A New Tagged Map for Smartphones in Bing Maps

It’s been one year since we first published a tagged map showing the main buildings on the Grand Canal. We have now re-created the same map in Bing Maps, which works great on smartphones and tablets too. So if you are interested in finding out the names of those wonderful palaces, just click on the link and select satellite layer bird’s eye view, rotating it to align the placemarks to the buildings’ main gate.

Enjoy!

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Visit to Venice Gardens – A Tagged Map

Here is a map showing gardens in Venice palaces that can be visited; before going, always check with the people who run the place to make sure you are allowed in. The essence of exploring Venice is getting far from the madding crowd, and looking for gardens can turn out to be an interesting experience, very different from the ordinary visit to the tourist-crowded spots of the city. Enjoy!

Venice map on mobile TuttoCitta’ app – A good alternative to Google Maps, with EVENTS around you!

With its newest release of the Google Map for mobile devices, Google is not doing a great service to Venice sightseers. The new look of the map at its highest resolution has confusing graphics,  which make it difficult to recognize where streets are and are not. In Venice, at night, in not-so-well-lit -though safe- streets confusing a canal for a tiny, narrow alley may result in getting an unwanted dive or ending up in a cul-de-sac. Here is an example of what you get to see in Venice on an Android device and Google Maps

newgmap

Can you make it out where streets exactly are and are not? Can you easily spot which way to go through the maze? We can’t, maybe you’re better than us. Hopefully, Google will amend this sooner or later … in the meanwhile, a useful alternative, especially if you are in a hurry and need to get somewhere quickly, an all-Italian free map solution comes to help: TUTTOCITTA’ (web-based). It is also available as an app for smartphones, tablet computers etc.

You can download the free TuttoCitta’ Android app here.

The iPhone, iPad etc app is available here.

Furthermore, TuttoCitta’ can show EVENTS around you!

TuttoCitta’ has a long history, and has helped Italians find their ways across major and minor cities and towns for decades.

Here is how the same area as above looks in TuttoCitta’

tcit

As you can see, here you can easily make out streets, buildings, and canals. And TuttoCitta’ has a streetview-like layer of its own too! An additional useful feature of TuttoCitta’ map of Venice is that it also shows (some) street numbers.  Venice has a very peculiar way of giving street numbers to its buildings… numeration of buildings is not based on the street in which the buildings are, but on the neighborhood. Venice is divided into six neighborhoods, the sestieri (pl.), each building in a sestiere (neighborhood) is given a number, which sometimes makes it  hard to find where the building corresponding to a specific address actually is, because the numbers do not get back to count one as you move from street to street. Ask Venetian postmen, who have very detailed maps of the city to be able to deliver mail.

Venice Buildings and Palaces of the Grand Canal Map With Names

While riding the vaporetto water-bus along the Canal Grande, Venice’s Grand Canal, have you ever wondered what the names of those marvelous palaces are? Here are two tagged Bing maps we created, with basic info on almost all the buildings and palaces overlooking the Grand Canal of Venice: Palaces of the Grand Canal – West Bank    Palaces of the Grand Canal  – East Bank. The two maps cover the canal’s West and East banks, respectively. To get the best view, click on ‘Visione Panoramica’, zoom in and use the left/right arrows to get a view of the front of each building with its own pushpin, as seen from the water side (canal buildings were conceived to be seen from the water, not from land). Names of people may be shown, they are the architects who designed the palace. Most Venetian palace names begin with the word Ca’ which simply means “house” or casa, in Italian, which is shortened into ca’  and followed by the name of the original owners of the homestead – e.g. Ca’ Marcello would be the ancestral dwelling of the Marcello family.

Further reading

If you are interested in discovering curious stories  about the Grand Canal and its beautiful palaces, we recommend this book:

Alberto Toso Fei’s The Secrets of the Grand Canal

which provides little-known, interesting stories and legends on many of the most remarkable palaces and places along Venice’s Grand Canal, on the people who built them and called them home. Concise but well-documented. Also provides a map of the Grand Canal with reference.

If you are interested in curious itineraries and good eat-outs to explore when in Venice, we highly recommend

The secret Venice of Corto Maltese by Lele Vianello and Guido Fuga:

Following the imaginary footsteps of the world-renown comics character Corto Maltese, and the real likes and promenades of his creator, Hugo Pratt, this book suggests seven itineraries, seven doors  that provide access to some of the most intimate places, venues, and eateries in Venice.  The itineraries are pivoted on good places where you can eat true Venetian food and the text is interspersed with historical and literary information, providing anecdotes about curious artifacts, ancient relics from Venice distant past that have survived to this day and have an interesting story to tell, and which you would never imagine existed unless you are a local.

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Palaces of the Grand Canal – a tagged map

While riding the vaporetto water-bus along the Canal Grande, Venice’s Grand Canal, have you ever wondered what the names of those marvelous palaces are? Here are two tagged Bing maps we created, with basic info on almost all the buildings and palaces overlooking the Grand Canal of Venice: Palaces of the Grand Canal  – East Bank and Palaces of the Grand Canal – West Bank. The two maps cover the canal’s West and East banks, respectively. To get the best view, click on ‘Visione Panoramica’, zoom in and use the left/right arrows to get a view of the front of each building with its own pushpin, as seen from the water side (canal buildings were conceived to be seen from the water, not from land). Names of people may be shown, they are the architects who designed the palace. Most Venetian palace names begin with the word Ca’ which simply means “house” or casa, in Italian, which is shortened into ca’  and followed by the name of the original owners of the homestead – e.g. Ca’ Marcello would be the ancestral dwelling of the Marcello family.

Further readings

If you are interested in reading curious stories about the Grand Canal and its beautiful palaces, we recommend this book: Alberto Toso Fei‘s  The Secrets of the Grand Canal:

which provides little-known, interesting stories and legends on many of the most remarkable palaces and places along Venice’s Grand Canal, on the people who built them and called them home. Concise but well-documented. Also provides a map of the Grand Canal with reference.
 
If you are interested in curious itineraries and good eat-outs to explore when in Venice, we highly recommend The secret Venice of Corto Maltese by Lele Vianello and Guido Fuga:
Following the imaginary footsteps of the world-renown comics character Corto Maltese, and the real likes and promenades of his creator, Hugo Pratt, this book suggests seven itineraries, seven doors  that provide access to some of the most intimate places, venues, and eateries in Venice.  The itineraries are pivoted on good places where you can eat true Venetian food and the text is interspersed with historical and literary information, providing anecdotes about curious artifacts, ancient relics from Venice distant past that have survived to this day and have an interesting story to tell, and which you would never imagine existed unless you are a local.^

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A different way of exploring Venice

Venezia! Venice, probably the world’s most beautiful, unique, intriguing city. A universe of its own. As  we live not far from there, on weekends we hop on the train and venture into the city’s labyrinthine calli (streets), mostly off the tourist-crowded areas. We thought we could share a few interesting places to see with you all, mainly in the forms of handy maps you can access from the internet while touring … a presto!

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